Tuesday, February 28, 2006

I cannot believe I just have to sit to receive healing without any participation.

When I kept a Studio open to the general public, and offered a weekly Reiki exchange, I provided a series of simple explanations about Reiki healing to all participants. I now realized that it is time to pubish these explanations on blog, as articles on my site may not have made it clear that there is in fact a participatory process to receiving Reiki, although quite a simple one.

To participate in Reiki, to receive healing, one must ASK for the treatment. Asking is participatory, and often, the most difficult part of any healing process. It is the asking that makes the healing possible. It is acknowledging that we need help, that we are willing to receive help.. and that we will do what it takes to get that help, even if "what it takes" may simply be sitting still.

Further, the client particpates in the energy healing process by exchanging energy for energy in the form of money for services. This exchange in my opinion is also participatory, and vital to the success of the healing process.

"Passive healing" can occur in all sorts of ways. Published here is another photo of the Amitabha mandala by the Dalai Lama's monks. I find it amazingly powerful, visually stimualting, wonderous & healing. Tibetan sand mandalas leave me speechless... and healed in deep and subtle ways I can't quite explain, but want to share with you.

Of course, it is important to note that Reiki is not a religious healing process... nor is it in any way related to the mandala.. I was just offering an illustration, or example of healing that requires only the participation of seeing.

Thank you for your kind attention to this blog. Best wishes, Ann George

Tuesday, February 07, 2006

Energy Healing & Tibetan Sand Mandalas

I am very happy to be able to share this detail of the center of the Amitabha Mandala with you.

This sacred image was drawn in Jacksonville, Florida by the Dalai Lama's monks who bless us yearly with a sand mandala ceremony. More photos will be on line as soon as possible, courtesy of Todd Ford.